Video
38

Industrial Waste… part 5

I do apologize for not being able to wrap this up sooner. It’s a big topic and I’m trying to do it justice, but at the same time there are oodles of other things going on here that I’d like to write about and scant amount of time to do so. Here are 7 points I would like to throw out there. No pictures. No frills. Just my two-cents worth and a hope that you will add yours.

1. Boys are made for work. I’m not pigeon-holing males into a meat-head role here, but Genesis 2 is very clear that God created Adam first and “put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and keep it.” This was his primary created role and he was perfectly equipped to fulfill it. This role was also the subject of his subsequent curse, “By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread till you return to the ground.”

2. For thousands of years that is exactly what boys grew up doing. They worked. And when they weren’t working, they played. Except for a few exceptions who were devoted to scholarly work at a young age, most would already be apprenticing for a career by 14.

3. With the advent of the printing press, Reformers like Martin Luther envisioned an entire population that could read the Bible for themselves (a noble and worthy goal) and primary schools were born.

4. The Industrial Revolution took this concept to an entirely new level with the effort to create a uniformly educated workforce universally equipped for factory operations.

5. Until the last century the purpose of schooling was to either provide a rudimentary
understanding of reading, writing and arithmetic or to prepare a student for a career particularly conducive to academic rigors.

6. Fast forward 100 years and social engineers now have boys as young as 3 years old spending the vast majority of their time in a classroom setting for the next 15 years of their life. Add to that the immense pressure to continue into higher education and another 2-6 years in an industry they possibly neither like nor excel at. Nor is this prolonged existence in academia any guarantee of a profitable career. There are some careers that necessitate a long and arduous classroom education. And I reiterate my awareness of those boys who thrive in a classroom setting. But the sad by-product of the education industry is the vast population of boys who not only fail to thrive in the classroom setting, but are also deprived of years and years of potential development actually doing what they were created to do.

7. Boys want to be good at something. It’s part of the drive God instilled in them. If they find out early on that that something is school then by all means cheer them on in that regard. But if the classroom is just not their thing, then give them a chance earlier on than 18 to find out what is! By 18 that drive to succeed may be already wasted due to the years of frustrating failure being forced to do what they are just not made for! That is industrial waste of epic proportions.

The video below has been widely circulated for a while now but I thought it illustrated a few of my points well.

38 thoughts on “Industrial Waste… part 5

  1. 110% spot on…the damage done to the souls of many boys by industrial education is like a death by a thousand cuts…unschooling is the remedy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Unschooling is certainly an option, as are homeschools, private schools, public charter schools, tech schools, trade schools, etc… The point is to stop sacrificing what best benefits our boys for the sake of the bureaucracy. There is so much fear over upsetting the status quo that we continue herding our struggling boys like lemmings over a cliff. Great to hear from you!

      Like

  2. Love this way of thinking, I am a terrible test taker and I’m not that good in school but I’m good at solving actual problems. I think that it is very smart to let kids find out what they are good at before the age of 18 because I’m 16 and i just figured out what i want to be. Ive told my parents plenty of times that i wish i could study what I’m interested in and not go to school. Its not that i don’t like school, its that I’m interested in learning about a job that i would like to succeed in. I believe that a hard worker is better than a lazy educated worker. If the person likes there job it isn’t a job and they will work hard in it and succeed. I totally love the idea of divergent thinking and how useful it really is. I am not a fan of the factory setup.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, Michael! I can tell you’ve already done some thinking on this subject. I’ve heard many employers echo your point about preferring a hard-working employee who is willing to learn over a well-educated one with no work ethic. Your thoughts are well formulated and I sense your passion. If I could give you any advice it would be to use the spare time that you do have to study those things that really do interest you. It’s amazing how much you can learn outside of school. Great job. Mrs. McEntee

      Like

      • Hey Mrs. McEntee, I enjoyed reading your blog and highly agree with your opinion. I find myself thinking during school, when will I use this in my career or why can’t we be learning something more beneficial. Just like you i notice how each individual has different talents and a different mind set’s. I think that if I geared my studies and time towards the job I enjoyed then my passion and work rate towards the job would increase. This would be both beneficial for myself and others around me. I agree with all your thought’s and love your idea’s that support divergent thinking and it would like to hear more from you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you, Riley. I appreciate your kind remarks. We all find ourselves questioning how we will use the circumstances we are placed under and cannot forget that God has an amazing plan for each of us which includes some of the very things we might not see as beneficial at the time. The point is to remember that God equipped you for work and that through Him you have everything you need to succeed at what He has in store for you. When school seems a waste of time or you’re feeling like you’re just not measuring up remember that God has far greater things in store for you and do everything you can in your spare time to prepare for that moment. Great comment. Mrs. McEntee

        Like

  3. Although I agree with some of these points I have found a few problems with it. I agree that our education is too standardized and could even limit the children’s imagination. If we are all being taught to be “normal” than why would we want to be different. But I could see non mandatory school abused. There are parents that do not have a strong belief on education. Those households may let their children to do whatever they want. And with our generation, I could see many children getting in trouble. If freedom is given too early than I could children becoming lazy instead of actually striving for success.
    School not only teaches the children physically but also mentally. I think that school helps a child to become discipline and mature. It is essential for children to learn with kids the same age and problem solve together. Also school can teach children to manage their time well and let them figure out the consequences by them selves in a low risk environment.
    School is not perfect. I agree that it is too broad and does not allow the children to find out what we really enjoy. But I also believe that school teaches us not only physical skills for our life but also social skills. Neither way is perfect and it never will be. I am not against the idea of children pursuing their dreams, but I am skeptic about it actually working out at a young age.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great points, James! You are right about one of the dangers of giving families the freedom to decide what is best for their children is that some families will make choices which benefit no one. I completely agree that teenagers roaming the streets with no accountability isn’t an ideal situation. But is the solution really to effectively imprison all rather than find more creative means to deal with few? You are also correct in pointing out all the potential benefits of traditional schools: teaching physical, mental, social and life skills, such as discipline, maturity, problem solving, and time management. But the question remains if that is the ONLY setting in which these things can be taught and are the methods used effective for teaching everyone? I admire your skepticism. It means you’re really thinking about it! Thank you so much for your well thought out comments, Mrs. McEntee

      Like

  4. Wow, what a great blog! I immensely enjoyed the seventh statement about giving boys a chance to find out early what they are capable of. I am a total believer of letting us as humans choose what path we want to take in life. It doesn’t half to be the working path, nor the education factor. But as a believer, we should be called to take a path/working field that God wants us to take.
    What I believe is that every kid, no matter what should at least take some simple schooling so at they are not as dumb as a rock. But when they hit that point of knowing what they want to do with their lives, then we shall let them choose whether to press on with the academic studies or not. Thank you for introducing this idea into my mind. I really love you thoughts and I enjoyed your writing!
    -E-swizel

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Esai, for your kind remarks. I totally agree with your point that a minimum amount of schooling so “they are not as dumb as a rock” is surely beneficial to everyone. But how many years do you think it should take to get your average person reading, writing, and doing enough basic math to make it in life? 5 years, 10 years, 13-15? Does school need to start quite so early and be dragged on quite so long? I also couldn’t agree more that as believers we should have the freedom to follow whatever path God is calling us to and to pursue whatever training would assist us in living out His perfect plan for our life. Don’t ever let anything get in the way of what you know He would have you do. Excellent thoughts. Mrs. McEntee

      Like

  5. I do very much agree that there should be more options available to boys or all kids than just schooling past an age of about 16. I myself have often thought about occupations in work fields which would not require high school education. I believe that if high school level education could be tied into apprenticeship training or trade schools, it would effectively teach students basic education that a high school diploma would give, but allow them to receive both this education and skills for a job in a much faster manner. This would allow these young men and women to get ahead faster in their work fields and it could cut years of frustration of being forced to think and learn a set curriculum a set way. If basic education was interwoven with training for these jobs, it would also motivate these students to excel in their studies as they push to excel in their training. I think that for some higher education is the pathway and for some its not. We shouldn’t force one way and not open the door to another.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great comments, Taylor. Very well thought out points. Your last one really summed up what I’m trying to get across the most: it does a everyone a disservice when we minimize options in favor of a universal path. The more choices our young people have regarding their education and training, the better we are able to equip them to effectively carry out the special plan God has for each of their lives. Keep thinking! Mrs. McEntee

      Like

  6. I strongly agree with this idea.
    I think that if schools were better individualized and made to suit the needs of all children, rather than just the needs of those “who thrive in a classroom setting”, the world would see a much larger percentage of youths that know what their calling is early on in life. I personally am a hands-on learner. In other words, I need to physically do something before I can fully understand the material being taught. However, most schools do not teach in support of this way of learning. Because of this I do not have even a slight idea of what I want to be when I am older. Another key flaw of the standard schooling system that I would like to point out is its length of day. I believe that a kindergarteners school day should be significantly shorter than a 12th graders school day. If younger children’s days were shorter, they would be able to find out wether they were meant for school or something else much more easily, and then if they were meant for school they could simply stay in the schooling system.
    I enjoyed reading your blog Mrs. McEntee. Thank You.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great response, Sean. You are definitely not alone in your propensity for “hands-on learning.” It really is too bad there are not more opportunities to learn in this way. But unfortunately we now live in “The Information Age” rather than “The Experiential Age” and you are going to have to work hard to find the occasions for actually doing the things that would help you learn. I also totally agree with your point about the long school day. Classroom exposure is great for little ones but children need to know that there are other arenas in their world for them to succeed in. Keep thinking AND doing. Mrs. McEntee

      Like

  7. I do agree with many of your points, God did create man to work. But he did not create man to work alone. “As for you, be fruitful and increase in number; multiply on the earth and increase upon it.”(Genesis 9:7) When god created man he created them in his own image. (Genesis 1:27) All men are in gods image but it is not hard to tell all men are different. In order to be able to function in daily life, a man must not be secluded and therefor exempt from the way of thinking of others. The problem Is communication. If all men think divergently they are all thinking on a hire level. If all men think divergently there are trillions of different possible reactions, out comes, answers, to questions found trivial by the standard thinker. For he knows what the other standard thinker meant when he asked for a cup of coffee. He did not wonder if he wanted a cup of raw beans, flowers form the plant, a shovel in which to move dirt in the coffee field, or to buy a coffee planation. Simply put there is a time and use for everything, and boys should grow up and, in the end, be able to consciously choose the state of mind to be in at the time of there choosing allowing harmony in the overall picture. Moving past just the physical likeness but to the mental one. So men can work together with the least confusion or friction possible. If you under stand both the finite and infinite ways of thinking and can communicate them, then you can call yourself free.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Those are some really profound thoughts, William. It is very interesting that God gave man those two directives: to work and to increase in number. But because of our fallen world the number one frustration of any job is other people! It was an amazing gift of God to create us all as free, independent thinkers but that does make communication a challenge. The role of education isn’t just to impart the appropriate skills to get the job done but to train an individual to communicate and work well with others. The question then arrises: Is the most effective way to learn how to work with individuals completely different from yourself to spend 13 or more years of your life almost exclusively with others of the same age and socio-economic background as yourself in a setting that operates intrinsically by conformity? That might indeed produce less “confusion and friction” but it potentially creates a thinker that is anything but free.
    I thoroughly enjoyed your response. Well done! Mrs. McEntee

    Like

  9. I completely agree with your way of thinking and the points mentioned in the video. I remember hearing from another source that if our schooling system changed two simple things about it, we would produce a new group of thinkers that are better equipped to tackle an ever-changing society.
    Number one is: Get rid of the foreign language class. Not only is it obsolete with programs like Google translate, I know from personal experience from my current education, that no one takes it seriously. A better option would be to make it an option course.
    Second is: Do not place kids in the same class based on age. If a high school senior has troubles with a freshman or sophomore algebra course, then why is he or she required to struggle or at the very least cram what he just learned into a brief summer. A more successful approach would be to put the similarly skilled students together and help out the ones who are struggling with their academics, not continually put them down and judge them based upon their close in age peers.

    The thought that college leads to a job is very outdated indeed. College is an opportunity to further your education to give you a better chance at life. Boys in general at school may be book savvy or more hands-on. Constricting the mind will not further it. The points you listed above are very valid and applicable in today’s society. I like your way of looking past the old ways of thinking and seeing around the obstacles to discover a different path, instead of continuing to travel on it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for the comments, Matthew! Those are very interesting changes suggested by your source. I’m very curious how he or she narrowed it down to those two in particular. But it seems they struck a chord with you and you could definitely relate. You have clearly put a lot of thought into this topic and engaged it well. Keep thinking! Mrs. McEntee

      Like

  10. I really agree with point number 7, that we should be able to explore our options outside of what we constantly do at school. Honestly, school feels like a repetitive thing and has caused a routine to be formed out of that, that all of us need to follow, causing the dislike of school. Its like if you play a song too many times and eventually gets old. Having opportunities to do find what we love to do and excel at it, provides the wanting to learn to be better at what you are doing. Pushing yourself to be the best you can be, but also enjoying what you do.

    Like

  11. I certainly agree with this. The academic world puts so much focus on forcing students to think a certain way, as if that’s the only sign of intelligence! Kids should be free to explore what they want without feeling like there’s something wrong with their interests. There’s more to being smart than memorizing numbers. I find it hard to believe that the world will collapse if students get to choose what they want to learn about from an early age.

    Like

  12. I partly agree with this because I do believe that kids should focus on something that they love and want to pursue as a career. On the other hand though I do not agree with this because what if they change their mind and decide to be something else or maybe they do not want to pursue that and now they have no idea what they want. School is a great place to figure out what you want to be because you have all of these classes to take and by taking these classes you can find out what interest’s you and what does not. I think it all depends on what works for you. For some people it is school and for others it is going out on their own to pursue their passion. There is nothing wrong with either one of them and I think they both should be encouraged to do what they want to do and ow they want to do it.

    Like

  13. This certainly was interesting. What really hit home to me was the portion of the video that talked about children being given prescriptions to try and get them to pay attention more in class. Throughout most of my elementary school and high school experience, I was given medications such as Aderol to try and get me to focus more. However, they ended up posing more problems to my health (such as sleep deprivation) than it did to help me learn. Another thing I found interesting was the points you mentioned about being able to find out what you want to do in life. I personally think that if more years of one’s schooling were structured like college courses (as in you get to choose which classes to take for the most part and take a few mandatory classes for general education), then it may benefit a student’s learning and help them either find out what they want to do in life more easily or let them practice and learn about it more often. However, these are just my ideas and may be completely off. Anyways, thank you for posting your ideas, they were very interesting!

    Like

  14. I agree with this idea. I don’t think that we should be put into groups based on our age that can limit creative thinking. I also agree that throughout the years, divergent thinkers minds were changed to think as everyone else, with no creativity. I wish in school we could learn more practical tools for everyday life. Less repetition in the classroom and instead, learn new ideas and concepts. Schools should focus on each student, to individualize the learning around each students needs.

    Like

    • I completely agree with all of it. I have written multiple responses to this and honestly I could talk forever about it. I loved it. I think it applies to everyone in someway and I hope a discussion like this can lead to more. That one day there are changes made, so that when it is time for my children to go to school, they will be contributing to society, not just preparing to enter into it. I would love the idea that my generation is going to change the world so drastically, but I think we are poorly educated in what it will take to change a society, in fact the only place I have ever heard that idea proposed was in church. Ironically enough from the stuffy stigma of religious affiliation, I’ve heard the most talk of making our world a better place by making a change in it through our actions. I do not have a solution or anything near a formulated idea, but I know it starts with education. I believe all of this is a step in the right direction. If only we were in a constant state of mind for change.

      Like

  15. Wow. I have not agreed with something so profoundly ingenious since Rob Bell’s presentation on “Everything is Spiritual”. I agree 100% with point number 6, and with what the video states about students not fitting in with the guidelines and frequent expectations and requirements of modern education. People often get mixed up with the common assumption that if you skip school or don’t do well academically, then you don’t fit into society. What they don’t stop to think about is maybe that education is teaching them the wrong things entirely. It may sound structured and informative, but did God create to learn from the world and conform to its thoughts because that’s what we’ve been taught? Or did He create us to be unique and think for ourselves? If He didn’t want this, he would’ve stuck Adam in the Garden, handed him a list of expectations and said, “Your life must meet all of these expectations. Have fun!” But obviously, God created us with talents, passions and desires that bring glory to Him, not to the earth. So why should that beautiful potentiality be erased from our minds?

    I think this not only applies to boys, but to girls as well. My sister, for example, wants to become a midwife when she graduates. But is sitting in a chair, stretching the limits of her brain by powering through Algebra going to help her achieve this dream? It does, yes, but only because schools require the specific amount of credits for you to make any advancement in your career. Sure the extra education helps stretch the limits of our minds, and allows us to think more about certain situations, but is it necessary to impose so much as an A or an F based on how well you accomplish the requirements of the education? Nope.

    Excellent application. I love the amount of thought and ingenuity that was put into this series of posts, it really keeps me thinking: Am I here doing this because I want to? Or because I am forced to? I believe God has the ultimate say of what we are to do with our gifts and talents. However, education often tries to replace Him with something false and hopeless that won’t benefit those people who aren’t built to study Biology or Calculus. It often harms us, corrupts our minds and sometimes even destroys our ability to function the way God intended. We should be able to choose how we want to approach education, not be forced to falsify our identities for the sake of “learning”.

    Like

  16. I’ve really enjoyed reading your blog, your writing style makes it easy to read and encourages me to read more. On the topic of Industrial Waste, I agree on the points pertaining to the idea of actually teaching the student what they want and need, and in a way that works for them. Like you, I grew up in the public school system, and even though I generally fit into the “intellectual” category I never really liked school since it was all repetition and memorization of a couple subjects. It would be nice if schools would let students learn about different subjects that interest them, and eventually guide them towards the career path they both enjoy and excel at the most.As a student who the “classical” subjects comes easy to, “the system” doesn’t even work for me, and that is a sign that change should happen. Thank you for writing this series, I really enjoyed reading through it.

    Like

  17. I somewhat disagree & somewhat agree. I, being a child labeled with ADD when I was in 2nd grade all throughout my public school career. Being there felt like such a drag, what with all the teachers giving me “special homework.” I absolutely hated it. I craved being like the group my entire life, being someone normal, not labeled as “special.” On the other hand I believe that more & more people with this are beginning to seem like they do need these things like special classes & drugs to help them through, but in all honesty I don’t care much, because it is none of my business.

    I would request that you do not share this response with the rest of the class in order to uphold my image. Thank you.

    Like

  18. Man, this has really been thought provoking. I guess I’ll just point a few things out that I think, because trying to bring out minute details drove me crazy.

    1) Compulsory education SHOULD be compulsory: Education shouldn’t be an option, it needs to be a part of every adolescent’s life.

    2) Standardization: Test Scores and GPA are the bane of every high schooler’s existence. Getting into college and getting scholarships is now all about playing the game. In addition, standardization of education can be taken advantage of by tyrannical leaders, which can lead to the dumbing down of society. However, everyone student should know the basics of math, critical reading and writing, science, government, etc.

    3) Early Learning: To have truly effectual teaching, one must partake in thorough, immersive interaction with infants as they grow, which will help their minds to think more critically in the future. Also, subjects taught in high school should be brought down to a lower grade. Seven years of basic arithmetic is too much. No wonder many kids hate math.

    4) Life Skills: If there isn’t a total overhaul of schooling as suggested in this post or the video, then there should at least be mandatory classes throughout high school for students to receive non-academic training, such as trades, home economics, survival skills, etc.

    We could go into great detail on this, but the thing is, we’re all on different paths in life, and our success may not be society’s definition of success. We must do our best to be who God made us to be, and that is that.

    I am thankful for this opportunity to share some of my thoughts, and if I find the time I may put in more commentary.

    Like

  19. I recognize truth behind all of your points, but the one that resides in me is number 6. The undeniable truth is that the vast majority of boys thrive outside of the classroom. However, there are those who feel at home in the classroom, one of them being myself.
    The system of school, which is forced upon the youth, is, shall say I say, flawed tremendously. Not only do they shove a universal education into the mind of children, but also limit the students options greatly until college; the schooling system takes away the choice of freedom.
    A strong argument brought up for teaching adolescents and keeping them in school is that they are not fully developed to be making their own choices. I can agree with this on a personally level because I would have never chosen my career without the help of my education. In a sense, education which is taught in your developing years will help you pick a career for the rest of your life. There are always exceptions such as choosing a career early on or changing your career years later, but generally, you are stuck with it.
    I personally can not rest in peace on one side or the other. The youth have the freedom to choose whatever career path they desire if they work hard for it. I believe that the 13 years of education which is provided, should be taken as a gift. You develop in those years and go through the process of becoming an independent adult. If you want to pursue a higher education, then by all means go for it. However, if you find a career that you feel called to, follow through with it.
    If we can change one thing in schooling, let it be this. Change the environment which the child learns in. I am in no sense proposing that we live in an idealistic utopia of a classroom. That would be unrealistic. What I am trying to say is, do not make a standard level on which every child must reach or he/she is seen as uneducated. If one falls behind, they can be seen as a failure. Do not allow them to be tormented by fellow peers, because not only does it damages them mentally, but it can potential ruin any future plans. Many students have kakorrhaphiophobia and a fear of judgement, which causes them to shy away from trying. My overall point being, support the child with whatever decision he/she chooses and be there to help them along the way, whether they struggle or not.
    I apologized if I strayed off topic. Give the child an education until he/she is able to decide what career path they want to head down. Do not limit them, but do not push them to reach an exact level of education. Help and guide them down the path which they choose and which God has provided for them. These are just some of my opinions, none of which may even be true.

    Like

  20. I believe that school is one of those things in life that you’re only going to get out of it what you want from it. To show up to school everyday with a poor attitude and trying to figure out why your there, it would be best for them to focus their energy elsewhere. Some people will want to be doctors, lawyers and engineers, which is a career that will need schooling even if its not your favorite thing to do. What’s a lot of times over looked is for society to function you need plumbers, carpenters and fisherman. While school wouldn’t hurt them in the field that they are going after, it might not be needed. Instead they could maybe direct their time and effort into the specific field that they are going after. The biggest problem with Americans is we are spoiled in a sense that school is forced upon us, and we should be doing better things with our time. While half way across the world their are families who have given up everything they have so that their children can be more then they ever were. Living where we do and given what we have, there is no reason why we shouldn’t succeed in life. Success is a word that is define by your personal standards, like I said we still need those people who are willing to do the jobs that no one wants to. We have been given all we need to be who ever we want in this world, all we need to do is take it and make it happen.

    Like

  21. I felt that there was some truth to this video, such as the idea that school is focused around a particular kind of student. However, I believe that school is a necessity to the growth of a child because it stimulates and trains their brain towards problem solving.
    As students, we are rarely faced with problems asking “how to solve x” outside of school, but it trains our brains to solve complex issues. Along with that, school can be customized by the students choice of electives. Electives allow the student to get credits for classes that will help them follow their interests and prepare them for life after school. Although the video has good points, it ignores the fact that school has classes that are specialized for individual interests.

    Like

  22. Liking all these ideas and i believe that there are better ways to do things than how it is done now. I could have told you years ago what subjects i like and do well in, and what ones are the opposite. The classroom environment does not rightly equip us for the “real world” and these thoughts show what is wrong. I totally agree with this.

    Like

  23. This video was really interesting but I don’t really agree with just dropping out of school. Because it is not Christ like and after all are we not supposed to try to be like Christ. God gave us these wonderful minds and we should try our best to utilize them.

    Like

  24. I definitely agree with this blog. I agree most boys find alot more success and interest outside of the classroom, along with some girls. Also the most girls that do succeeded in school are really learning to PASS the class instead of learning the material. Many people say that school teaches problem solving, which i do agree with but i feel there are many other things that can teach problem solving along with interest, motivation, and passion.

    Like

  25. I agree with many of the points made regarding Divergent Thinking. It sounds ridiculous, but I actually thought of the novel Divergent and the whole corruption of the governmental system and its factions in the book. It’s a lot more toned down in our education system now but it really matches up (mind you, on a lighter scale) with how “Divergents”, or in our case divergent thinkers, are sort of pushed out for their difference and inability to conform. You’re totally right, I feel we should not be making such generalizations for kids. We are all unique, therefore we cannot fit into a mold without pressure and reshaping. The education system may be fantastic for some learners (much like the Erudite’s in Divergent) but on the other hand, I feel school should support the strengths and weaknesses, dislikes and likes of a child to the point where the future occupation of that child is found depending on the strengths and passions of the individual. I do believe, however, that there is a time and place when a baseline education is needed, but i don’t think that that baseline education should be drawn out for as long as it is (Until we reach 17 or 18). Our society needs a balance of individual strengths. The fact that someone has greater strengths in more hands-on areas of society, does not make them stupid. I agree, in that sense. Do what you’re good at AND love, but take your brain with you. Having people with different ideas and strengths, working together would make our society, country even, so much stronger. Focusing on the individuals would be wise, as a whole.

    Like

  26. Love it! I think that students are forced to learn a certain way and that is how it is suppose to be. I think that this limits students to be free in what they want to explore, what they wanna be in the future, things that are actually coming up soon. , I personally think that this also limits creativity and suppress’s more knowledge than teaching it.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s