Iron-meltdown

There is absolutely such a thing as having too much fun.  Since my last post we got so busy with fun activities that my body and mind finally collapsed into an exhausted heap.  My little meltdown happened to coincide with Ironman week and quite possibly the most epic meltdown by a professional athlete I have ever witnessed.   The fatigue set in sometime during our camping trip to Volcano which was marked by no sleep for me and the start of a series of fevers that passed through the boys which of course resulted in more sleepless nights for me.  The boys all happened to be well-enough to compete the day of the Ironkids mini-triathalon which is about as crazy as kids sporting events should legally be allowed to be.  It’s not timed and there are no places since all age-groups/distances have the same start and finish however, the fact that the majority of the young competitors are the children of the actual Ironman competitors makes this particular competition, well, extremely competitive.  For some reason, our boys love these races.  I find them stressful, chaotic, and exhausting which is probably exactly why our boys love these races.

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This is just the kick off for the real Ironman race which consists of over 2000 uber-athletes swimming 2.5 miles, then biking 120 miles before topping their morning off with a full marathon.  The race starts at 6:30 AM and they have until mid-night to finish but the professionals are usually done by lunch time, which is usually right when we’re all worn out just from watching.  It really is an amazing display of physical strength and endurance.  If only these athletes could exercise the same kind of self-discipline in their private lives.  Unfortunately the morning after the race there was a huge blow up between a neighboring Ironman and his Ironlady which resulted in her $10,000 bike being smashed into pieces, her Dad being pummeled, and a very large diamond ring being tossed back at it’s giver.  Oh yeah, and then about midnight there were the suitcases being thrown down the stairs and 2 front tires being flattened on the rental car.  I believe in the sporting world, this kind of premature and permanent loss of momentum is called “bonking.”

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See the beautiful white bell tower in the background?  That’s our nearly 200-year-old church where our dear Kahu David has been faithfully preaching The Word, most recently from the first part of the book of Revelation.  Here’s an excerpt from chapter 3 and the words to the Church at Philadelphia:  “I know your works…I know that you have but little power, and yet you have kept my word and have not denied my name…Because you have kept my word about patient endurance, I will keep you from the hour of trial that is coming on the whole world…I am coming soon.  Hold fast what you have, so that no one may seize your crown.  The one who conquers, I will make him a pillar in the temple of my God.”  What a beautiful picture of the Bride of Christ!  Our little church represents just a piece of that “patient endurance.”  Since it’s founding by some brave-hearted New England missionaries at the appeal of some very determined Hawaiians, this church has witnessed the rise and fall of kingdoms, the expansion of empires, the empowering and subjugation of peoples, the burning and rebuilding of pagan temples and their idols.  It has withstood hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis.  And yet those lava walls still house the continual praises of the people in this community.  The walls themselves will crumble, but be it ever our prayer that His people here will “hold fast.”  And be it ever our prayer that our marriages and our families will “hold fast.”

Ironfinish!

Ironfinish!

I want my family to have an Ironman finish.  Lord grant us the “patient endurance”  to “hold fast” and “conquer” the incredible odds stacked against families like ours.  Only His Sustaining Power will prevent us from a big-time “bonk.”

That mini-bonk I experienced last week?  Probably the result of “over-biking.”  I guess that’s what happens when a triathlete expends too much energy on the bike section and doesn’t have enough left for the 26 mile run.  I put so much energy into the fun extra stuff I just didn’t have any left for the day to day demands.  Gotta learn to pace myself!  Oh, and I need to learn to “slow down through the aid-stations” and take advantage of available nutrition and hydration which was the much talked about key to this year’s victories.  But oh, do the miles seem to stretch on and on between those roadside run-thrus!  Thank the Lord for those dear people that He has placed strategically along the way to hand out a cup of encouragement or a bit of spiritual nourishment to us Moms!  You just might prevent a bonk!

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15 thoughts on “Iron-meltdown

  1. Great analogies! It was fascinating to read your “bystander” views of the Ironman activities and be educated past the media hype. You are running the race of life well as it is obvious that your eyes are fixed on the prize set before you, our Lord Jesus Christ! God, in His mercy and grace, will provide the aid-stations at just the right times for your needs. 🙂

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    • Thanks Helen! I definitely “slowed-down through the aid-station” this weekend. We got a cozy little place over at Volcano National Park to weather the hurricane in and came back quite rested!

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    • I did get finally get some rest! Mainly because Hurricane Ana was dumping so much rain on us there wasn’t much else to do but rest! Thanks again for sending a little bit of Autumn my way!

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  2. Thank you Julie, you certainly encourage mothers and others in seasons that can be overwhelming . . . yet knowing the strength to continue is ‘resting in Him’ who supplies all we need. Enjoy your week-end . . . love to all!!!

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  3. Thank you for being my cup of encouragement! Does carrying a baby qualify as a mini, yet ongoing bonk? 😉 Whew, I am feeling quite out of energy myself! (I am just older this time around I guess!!) I know this 8-ish week long leg of the race will be complete soon, and I can’t wait for the joy set before me!
    I think maybe I have it backwards, though. I’ve exerted so much energy on the things that “have” to be done and not reserved any for the fun! You have reminded me to have a little (but not too much!). I’m going to take a little time for that this week!
    I do pray for your family and love seeing your patient endurance! I pray the same “Iron-man” finish for mine, as well. Hold fast! 🙂 Love ya!

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    • I may be enduring but I wouldn’t say “patiently” at all! I am the most impatient person I have ever known. I even get impatient with my own impatience! Also, growing a baby can be a big-time bonk! Especially by the fifth go-around. Hang in there! You’ll be crossing the finish line before you know it and come out on the other side with a sweet little one to love on! Then you’ll really have a good excuse for letting all that day-to-day stuff slide!

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  4. Yay!! I’ve been stalking your blog, for what feels like weeks, but wasn’t really, waiting for this entry! Now I totally see why. All those fevers! Life in general! An Iron Kid race! Wow. And I’m going to make the understatement of the year: I think your kids have P.E. covered…..haaaahahahkaahahahaha! Very impressive. My kids would have drowned….OH, and glad to hear I’m not the only one who has melt downs. Great post. Of course, I only understood MOST of the symbolism, as it is 4:50, and I’m also ‘watching’ the boys play outside, so I have to ask: Do you do these triathlons too?

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  5. Wow! A blog stalker! That makes me totally legit! 🙂 To answer your last question, I’m afraid my long distance running days ended with my child-bearing years, although I have to admire gals like my sister-in-law over at http://easygoingorganizer.com/ who manage to keep up a running routine while running after a house full of kids. I do love bicycling, but only down hill, and I’d much rather be fishing on the shore than swimming with the fish. So triathlons are definitely not my thing. My husband has dabbled with it a bit and is a high school swim coach so he stands in as their trainer. In fact, he’s pretty much in charge of all their “P.E.;” taking them to hockey practice, picking them up from paddling (they walk there themselves), even doing full-on workout routines. I’m very “hands off” in that regard. No soccer mom syndrome here at all. I’m a firm believer in male-bonding. They can wallow in each other’s sweat and body-odor all they want! 🙂

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  6. Come on, Julie! Their “P.E.” is mostly swimming like the fish. A “sweat and body-odor” problem? But maybe in the triathlon the biking and running should come first and the swim last.

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    • Anyone who doesn’t believe my boys have a sweat and body odor problem has never suffered through a ride home from hockey practice with them. But having the swim last would be a great idea if it weren’t for the greatly increased potential for drowning!

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  7. You have a good point there. And can you imagine the mangled pile of wreckage approaching the finish line if the bike event was last. Better, I guess, to have the runners stagger and wobble in.

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